11
Oct

Jeopardy Champion Ken Jennings

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Celebrity, Editorial Work

Jeopardy champion Ken Jennings for Time Magazine.  Photo by John Keatley.

Jeopardy champion, author, and all around hilarious guy Ken Jennings for Time Magazine.  I don’t want to brag, but I may have stumped him on the pixel count of my Hasselblad H3D…

30
Mar

Dan Savage

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Blog, Celebrity, Editorial Work

Dan Savage portrait for Time Magazine by John Keatley.

I photographed Dan Savage for the March 28, 2011 issue of Time Magazine.  Dan is a sex columnist (Savage Love), and the founder of the It Gets Better YouTube campaign supporting bullied gay teens.  Thank you to Marie Tobias at Time for working with me on this assignment.  It was a lot of fun to think through the lighting for a Black-and-White portrait for a change.  There aren’t many assignments for B&W these days, and it really does take a different lighting approach than working with color.  This is my favorite image, as well as the one running in the magazine.

12
Jan

Dr. Marsha Linehan for Time Magazine

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Blog

Dr. Marsha Linehan for Time Magazine by John Keatley

Dr. Marsha Linehan

Dr. Marsha Linehan is a Psychologist and a Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington. She is one of the world’s leading experts on borderline personality disorder, (BPD).

“Borderline individuals are the psychological equivalent of third-degree-burn patients. They simply have, so to speak, no emotional skin. Even the slightest touch or movement can create immense suffering.” – Dr. Marsha Linehan

“Borderlines are the patients psychologists fear most. As many as 75% hurt themselves, and approximately 10% commit suicide — an extraordinarily high suicide rate (by comparison, the suicide rate for mood disorders is about 6%). Borderline patients seem to have no internal governor; they are capable of deep love and profound rage almost simultaneously. They are powerfully connected to the people close to them and terrified by the possibility of losing them — yet attack those people so unexpectedly that they often ensure the very abandonment they fear. When they want to hold, they claw instead. Many therapists have no clue how to treat borderlines. And yet diagnosis of the condition appears to be on the rise.” – John Cloud, Time

It’s a fascinating article, and you can read it in it’s entirety here at Time.com.

The portraits were taken at Dr. Linehan’s office on the UW campus.